Police warn of sick raccoons and risk to pets in Michigan

 

Sick Raccoon in Michigan

OTTAWA COUNTY, MI – A cluster of sick raccoons has prompted police in Grand Haven to issue an alert for dog owners regarding canine distemper.

Officers with the Grand Haven Department of Public Safety have responded to reports of five sick raccoons in the past “few weeks,” according to a news release sent by the department. It’s believed they were infected with canine distemper, a disease that can infect dogs as well as cats with a feline version. Vaccinations are available to prevent distemper in pets.

Because raccoons are nocturnal, those seen during daytime hours could be ill, especially if they appear disoriented and show no fear of humans, according to a fact sheet shared by the department.

Because raccoons are nocturnal, those seen during daytime hours could be ill, especially if they appear disoriented and show no fear of humans, according to a fact sheet shared by the department.

Because the disease can be transferred to dogs and other wildlife, it’s important to avoid sick animals and to contact law enforcement if one is hanging around. It’s advised calling local law enforcement or for a conservation officer, at who can euthanize the sick animal.

The Grand Haven Department of Public Safety provided these pieces of advice:

· Do not approach a sick animal, even if it seems docile or tame.

· Keep your dog on a leash during walks.

· Don’t leave dog food outside or feed wildlife. Take down bird feeders that seem to attract raccoons.

· If you have a sick raccoon in your yard, keep pets inside and call police.

· Make sure your pets are vaccinated.

Distemper cannot be transferred to humans, but it is highly contagious to some other animals.

Symptoms of distemper in raccoons include wandering outside during daylight, slow movement or stumbling, lack of fear of humans, appearing to be blind or confused, and suffering from mucous discharge around eyes and nose, coughing, vomiting and tremors. Infected animals can become aggressive if cornered.

The disease is transferred through aerosol droplets through sneezing, direct contact and possibly contact with contaminated objects. It’s also believed distemper can be transferred through contact with feces or urine of an infected animal, according to the Grand Haven fact sheet. Read Full Article 

***WE ARE STILL OPEN***

We know that these are trying times. People are scared and confused. We want all of our customers to know, that we are here for you. As exterminators, our services are considered essential by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as WORKERS ESSENTIAL CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE DURING COVID-19 RESPONSE.

With this in mind, we know that it is crucial to take every step possible to keep contact to a minimum and reduce and possibility to exposure to our customers and our employees. Because of this we have taken ADDITIONAL measures to reduce any risks.

I haven’t heard that noise before?

With the influx of families staying home, we have had a spike in homeowners hearing running and chewing in their attic that may have went unnoticed with the normal everyday hustle and bustle of daily life. Rest assured you have found the right company, even amongst this crisis, to handle any nuisance wildlife issue.

Did you know?

A lot of our work can be done from the exterior of your home? We can fully assess and seal up most homes from the outside without ever entering your house! You can also pay with a credit card over the phone. This allows you to have our full range of services done, while maintaining proper social distancing.

So please don’t hesitate. Call us now to set up an appointment. You can know that you have the most capable wildlife removal team at your disposal and that we are ready no matter what to rid you of those critters!